Användarnamn: Lösenord:    

Information Information

Många artikelförfattare vill gärna ha respons i form av konstruktiv kritik.

Hos Resejournalen kan man ge det dels genom att betygsätta artikeln och dels genom att ge artikeln en kommentar.

Nyckelord är ord som beskriver artikeln. Tryck på ett nyckelord för att hitta andra artiklar med samma nyckelord.

Information Annons
Information Mest lästa artiklarna
Calle / Bordershop /..134614 ggr
NAZAR ETT OSERIÖST..42833 ggr
Resan till den..29449 ggr
How to behave in..29350 ggr
How to behave in..28482 ggr
Underbara Thassos!24927 ggr
Cityguide: Chicago24733 ggr
How to behave in..23743 ggr
Två Thaifrälsta..21475 ggr
Hangzhou - The place..20213 ggr
 
  Artiklar > Reseberättelser > Hangzhou - The place of poets and good tea:

Hangzhou - The place of poets and good tea

Publicerad: 2006-02-08 00.00

  • Skriv ut
  • Betygsätt
  • Kommentera
  • Denna funktion gör det möjligt att bokmärka och dela med dig direkt till sociala nätverk.

The famous ancient proverb "In Heaven there is Paradise, on earth Suzhou and Hangzhou" means that Suzhou and Hangzhou were the finest and the most splendid places in the world. Hangzhou is a picturesque city with many beautiful scenic spots. The West Lake has been China's best-known tourist spot since ancient China. The tide of the Qiantang River attracts a great number of visitors every autumn.

Famous historic relics include the Six Harmonies Pagoda, the Temple of Inspired Seclusion (Lingyin Si), Tianzhu Temple, stone-tablet sculptures of the 16 Buddhists in the Confucius Temple, the statue of Goddess of Mercy (Guanyin) in the Yanxia Cave, the Jigong Hall in the Jingci Temple, and Buddhist statues in the Ziyang Temple.

Since the Ming Dynasty, Hangzhou has been famous for silk fabrics and silk embroidery. Silk, fans, and Longjing tea are called the Three Unique Specialties of Hangzhou. The other well-known products include West Lake lotus root starch, Tianzhu chopsticks, and white chrysanthemums. Hangzhou also has many famous shops and restaurants with a long history, such as Huqingyu Chinese traditional medicine shop, Zhangxiaoquan cutlery shop, Louwailou and Kuiyuan restaurants.

Hangzhou's inordinate beauty has been an inspiration to artists for centuries - Lin Hejiang, a tenth century poet is famous for having lived as a recluse on Solitary island for twenty years. And indeed, two more of China's most influential poets, Bai Juyi and Su Dongpo, served as governors here at that time.

During the Qing dynasty (1644-1911) the city became known as a popular tourist destination, much frequented by such notables as the Emperor Kangxi and Emperor Qianlong, who built a palace and important library here. Similarly, during the late twentieth century, Mao Ze Dong was smitten by its charm. He snatched moments from his hectic political life to write "Ode to the Mume Blossom", which by its very title recalls Lin Heijiang's "To the Mume Blossom", written a thousand years earlier.

Hangzhou rose to prominence as the capital of the Southern Song dynasty (1127-1279). Forced to flee before the invading Jurched, the Imperial court under the rule of the pusillanimous Emperor Gaozong (1107-1187) moved its capital southwards from Kaifeng to Hangzhou. Under the patronage of this court, Hangzhou's arts and commerce received unprecedented impetus, transforming it, in Marco Polo's words into, "a city of heaven...the finest and most splendid city in the world."

Chinese products, such as silk and ceramics, were traded for wood, pearls and handicrafts from Japan; ginseng and medicinal herbs from Korea; and spices, ivory and jewels from Southeast Asia and the Middle East. As a result, by the end of the thirteenth century, the wealthy population had swelled from half a million to nearly two million. The city became known for its sybaritic life: one resident had the floor of his house covered with tiles inlaid with silver; pets were dyed pink with balsam leaves and Hangzhou's West Lake became the focus of a thirteenth century pleasure-ground with splendid boats, restaurants and entertainers.

Seven hundred years later, Hangzhou's West Lake continues to draw foreign tourists and local Chinese to its beautiful shores.

Two famous teas are exported from Hangzhou: Longjing (Dragon Well) green tea and dried white crysanthemum flowers which are used as medicin. Hangzhou cuisine is the most famous representative of Hangzhou cooking. Its dishes include West Lake Fish in Vinegar Gravy, Pork Dongpo Style, Longjing Shrimp, and Aunt Song's Fish Soup.

Hangzhou is often said to be the home of the most beautiful women in China.

----------------------------------------

Places to see:

Solitary Island
(Gushan Dao)

Situated on the lake's northwest shore, this big island is connected to shore by the Xiling Bridge, dedicated to poet Su Xiaoxiao, who was entombed here in A.D. 501. Here the dawn mists enwrap a willow-draped shoreline that resembles an old Chinese landscape. A roadway sweeps eastward across Solitary Island toward the city skyline, past monumental tile-roofed halls built in the style of Qing Dynasty palaces. One of these buildings is the Zhejiang Provincial Museum, which contains the oldest grains of cultivated rice in the world (developed 7,000 years ago in a nearby Hemudu village). The museum is open daily from 8:30am to 5pm

----------------------------------------

Bai Causeway
(Bai Ti)

Solitary Island is connected to downtown Hangzhou by Baidi, one of the two great man-made causeways that divide West Lake into three parts. These two causeways are the finest stretches to walk on West Lake. Both are scenic and serene. The Bai Causeway is named after a Tang Dynasty poet, Bai Juyi, who served as prefectural governor here in A.D. 822 to 824 and saw to its construction. Composed of silt dredged from the lake, this causeway runs east for half a mile, rejoining the north shore road (Beishan Lu) at Broken Bridge (Duan Qiao), so named because when winter snows first melt the bridge appears from a distance to be broken.

----------------------------------------

Lakeshore Promenade

This combination walkway and roadway encircles West Lake. At Broken Bridge it joins the Bai Causeway and runs parallel to the western edge of downtown Hangzhou. The downtown portion of the promenade is dotted with pavilions that are jammed at dawn with devotees of the latest recreational craze, Western ballroom dancing, as well as with practitioners of the more ancient form of exercise, tai ji quan (shadow boxing).

----------------------------------------

Cruising West Lake

All along the lakeshore, but particularly on Hubin Lu (Lakeside Ave.) downtown and near Solitary Island (northwest corner of West Lake), there are boats for hire, from 3m (10-ft.), heavy wooden rowboats (where you take the oars) to small junks propelled by the owner's single oar to full-fledged ferries--flat-bottomed launches seating 20 under an awning. To tour the lake in a small junk, you have to bargain for the fare. The passenger ferries sell tickets at roughly twice the price. The touts will find you if you don't get to a ticket booth first, but the easiest place to purchase your ticket for a cruise is at the dock across the street from the Shangri-La Hotel. Here many a fairly comfortable and sizable motorized launch, its bowsprit the head of a dragon, departs for a 2-hour lake tour, with stops at several of the islands.

----------------------------------------

Island of Little Oceans
(Xiao Ying Zhou)

Make sure your boat docks on this island at the center of West Lake. The Island of Little Oceans was formed during a silt-dredging operation in 1607. As a Chinese saying goes, this is "an island within a lake, a lake within an island." Its form is that of a wheel with four spokes, its bridges and dikes creating four enclosed lotus-laden ponds. The main route into the hub of this wheel is the Bridge of Nine-Turnings, built in 1727. Occupying the center is the magnificent Flower and Bird Pavilion, an exceedingly graceful structure that is notable for its intricate wooden railings, lattices, and moon gates. It isn't an ancient work, dating only from 1959, but it's a superb rendition of the best in traditional Chinese architecture. It's open daily from 8am to 5pm

----------------------------------------

Three Pools Mirroring the Moon

Located just off the southern shore of the Island of Little Oceans, this monument consists of three little water pagodas, each about 2m (6 ft.) tall. They have "floated" like buoys on the surface of West Lake since 1621. Each pagoda has five openings. On evenings when the full moon shines on the lake, candles are placed inside. The effect is of four moons shimmering on the waters. Even by daylight, the three floating pagodas are a startling touch, the grand flourish of ancient engineers and scholar-administrators who shaped the lake into a work as artful as any classical garden.

The floating pagodas were the creation of Hangzhou's most famous governor, the poet Su Dongpu (A.D. 1036-1101), who placed the original trio of pagodas here, at the deepest point in the lake, to stake out an area where water plants were forbidden to grow. Lily, lotus, and a host of other plants had repeatedly strangled West Lake and still pose a threat.

----------------------------------------

Su Causeway
(Su Ti)

The best view from land of the Three Pools Mirroring the Moon is from the Su Causeway (Sudi), the great dike that connects the north and south shores along the western side of West Lake. This pathway across West Lake has vistas as rewarding as those along the east-west Bai Causeway, but the Su Causeway is three times as long (running nearly 3km/2 miles). Lined with weeping willows, peach trees, and shady nooks, it crosses six arched stone bridges. Locals fish and picnic along its hems.

The Su Causeway begins on the north shore at a small park, Lotus Stirred by the Breeze, across from the patriotic Monument to Yue Fei, a 12th-century general. Favored by Emperor Kangxi, this park became the best spot for viewing lotus blossoms. Today it is also popular with fanciers of gardens and koi (goldfish), especially at Jade Spring in the Hangzhou Botanical Garden, about a mile (1.6km) west of the Shangri-La Hotel open daily 8am-6pm, and at Huagang Yuan (Flower Harbor Park), which is at the south end of the Su Causeway (tel. 0571/8796-7386; open daily 8am-6pm; admission ¥12/$1.45). Flower Harbor Park's pavilions and fish ponds date back to the Qing Dynasty.

----------------------------------------

Lingyin Temple

Open from dawn to dusk, this temple in the lush hills just west of West Lake is easily reachable by bicycle or taxi. Lingyin Temple (Temple of the Soul's Retreat) has been rebuilt a dozen times since its creation in A.D. 326. The entrance path is lined with attractions, including a sculpture garden on the left (Fei Lai Feng Zaoxiang) with reproductions of famous Buddhist statues from all over China.

The real attraction on the way to the temple is a limestone cliff, called the Peak That Flew from Afar (Feilai Feng), so named because it resembles a holy mountain in India seemingly transported to China. The peak, nearly 150m (500 ft.) high, contains four caves and about 380 Buddhist rock carvings, most of them created over 600 years ago during the Yuan Dynasty. The most famous carving here is of a Laughing Buddha, carved in the year A.D. 1000. This Buddha of the Future is laughing with joy at the ultimate glorious fate of the world and he is laughing with amusement at the childish vanities of the unenlightened. Scholars have deemed these stone carvings the most important of their kind in southern China.

The small pagoda at the entrance to the first temple, built in 1590, is the burial marker for a monk named Huili, who founded Lingyin Temple 16 centuries ago. The present buildings go back decades rather than centuries, but they are immense--some of the grandest temples in China. The Front Hall and the Great Hall beyond it have the typical Chinese Buddhist layout. The Front Hall contains the Four Guardians of the Four Directions, two on either side, protecting a rotund image of Maitreya (the Laughing Buddha). Lingyin's Maitreya dates from the 18th century, and behind this image is a statue in camphor wood of Skanda, another protector, which dates from the Southern Song Dynasty when Hangzhou was China's capital. The even larger Great Hall contains an image of Buddha crafted in 1956 from 24 sections of camphor and gilded with nearly 3,000 grams (104 oz.) of gold--not a bad modern re-creation.

----------------------------------------

Dragon Well Tea Village

Another jaunt by bicycle or taxi west of West Lake is toward the village of Dragon Well, the capital of Hangzhou's famous Longjing tea, grown only on these hillsides and revered throughout China as cool and refreshing--a favorite summertime quencher. Longjing tea is said to be a supreme vintage with four special characteristics: its green color, smooth appearance, fragrant aroma, and sweet taste. The best tea at Dragon Well is still picked and processed by hand. A popular stop near the village is the
Dragon Well Tea Plantation (Cha Yuan Chun) open daily from 8:30am to 4:30pm. Here you can comb through its extensive displays of Chinese teas, pots, cups, and ceremonial tea implements. The admission includes a tea sampling and demonstration of the Chinese tea ceremony in a private tearoom.

Dragon Well Village itself, a few miles beyond the Tea Plantation, is where the best tea is grown and processed. Plenty of local grandmas are on hand to kidnap independent travelers, take them into their homes and kitchens, ply them with hand-picked tea, and sell them a few pounds at inflated prices. They can be resisted, but they can also be regarded as a special indulgence of this traditional Chinese paradise.


West Lake
West Lake

West Lake
West Lake

West Lake
West Lake

West Lake
West Lake

West Lake
West Lake

West Lake
West Lake

West Lake
West Lake

Park opposite West Lake
Park opposite West Lake

Park opposite West Lake
Park opposite West Lake

Park opposite West Lake
Park opposite West Lake

Park opposite West Lake
Park opposite West Lake

Park opposite West Lake
Park opposite West Lake

Park opposite West Lake
Park opposite West Lake

Park opposite West Lake
Park opposite West Lake

Park opposite West Lake
Park opposite West Lake

Park opposite West Lake
Park opposite West Lake

Lingyin Temple
Lingyin Temple

Lingyin Temple
Lingyin Temple

Lingyin Temple
Lingyin Temple

Lingyin Temple
Lingyin Temple

Lingyin Temple
Lingyin Temple

Lingyin Temple
Lingyin Temple

Lingyin Temple
Lingyin Temple

Lingyin Temple
Lingyin Temple

Lingyin Temple
Lingyin Temple

Av:  horsemandk

  • Skriv ut
  • Betygsätt
  • Kommentera
  • Denna funktion gör det möjligt att bokmärka och dela med dig direkt till sociala nätverk.
Betygsätt artikeln
Logga in för att betygsättaLogga in för att betygsättaLogga in för att betygsättaLogga in för att betygsättaLogga in för att betygsätta(Logga in för att betygsätta)
Läst: 20214 ggr | Betyg: 0,00 (0 röster)

Kommentera artikeln

Du måste vara registrerad och inloggad för att kunna kommentera.

Det finns ännu inga kommentarer. Bli först med att kommentera den här artikeln!



 
 
 

Bli värdfamilj

merVäder.se | Väderprognos, väderkarta, 5 & 10-dygnsprognos


Annonsera på Resejournalen
  Kontakta oss / Rapportera fel © Copyright 2003-2011 Resejournalen (Version 3.5.15)